Jimmy 'The Rev' SullivanFor the first time since his lifeless body was discovered the morning of Dec. 28, the family of Avenged Sevenfold drummer Jimmy 'The Rev' Sullivan have spoken out about the rocker's untimely death. He was 28 years old, and results of a preliminary autopsy returned inconclusive results. Further tests were ordered, to determine what killed the drummer. Police do not suspect foul play.

"We would like to thank all of Jimmy's fans for the heartfelt comments that have been posted -- it is comforting to know that his genius and antics were appreciated and that he was loved so much," the family says in an online statement. "Our hearts are broken -- he was much too young to fall."

The night Sullivan's remains were discovered, Avenged Sevenfold issued a statement saying that it was "with great sadness and heavy hearts that we tell you of the passing today of Jimmy 'The Rev' Sullivan. Jimmy was not only one of the world's best drummers, but more importantly he was our best friend and brother. Our thoughts and prayers go out to Jimmy's family and we hope that you will respect their privacy during this difficult time."

Avenged manager Larry Jacobson remembered Sullivan last week in his own statement. He said Sullivan was an especially warm and friendly person who had "an easy smile and a laugh, and he was as smart as they come. You could sit and talk to him about anything."

The last time Jacobson saw Sullivan was at a friend's wedding reception. He seemed to be in good health and good spirits, and spoke with Jacobson about his recent Lasik eye surgery and the new car he'd just bought. When Sullivan's loved ones gathered Monday night to share memories of the drummer, the manager says the "mood ranged from deep and somber to smiles and laughs as they began to reminisce about the experiences everybody had with him. He was a loving son and a loving brother -- like no one you'd ever seen, and talented beyond people's perception."

Sullivan, Jacobson said, was the kind of chap who wouldn't mince words. "He was expressive. He'd tell you how he felt about you -- you didn't wonder, because he'd put his arm around you," the manager recalled. "He knew how to tell his friends he loved them."