Courtney Love is a cultural lightning rod. Perhaps that's why the singer attracts such a wide cross section of fans. Currently on a short tour, Love, who hopes to release a new album and autobiography by year's end, mused about who she attracts these days and shared her always interesting opinion on the state of alt rock, the roost over which she ruled two decades ago.

When discussing what songs from her vast catalog that she might perform on tour, Love said, "We'll work within the oeuvre of what we have, but in small venues and for superfans, and some people who have never seen me -- girls that were 12 in 2010 are now 15, so they can come see me."

She then revealed what her core demo is comprised of in 2013, telling Rolling Stone, "That's my demographic –- smart guys that are hetero, a lot of gay guys, a lot of disaffected girls and some women that were like, 'I grew up on you.'"

Even with that dissection of her fanbase, Love thinks her music transcends gender and the grunge tag, saying, "The best compliment I've received in forever is somebody played me a band with all males in it and said, 'God, this sounds like Hole,' meaning they understood there was an acoustic and sonic aesthetic element to the music that had nothing to do with gender. And I was so impressed with this person noticing that."

Regarding the dreaded "grunge" label, she said, "The last interview I had was with this guy where he was like, 'Yeah, you were part of a movement 23 years ago that I find important: grunge.' I'm like, 'No, we weren't. We were no more grunge than the Chili Peppers.' We weren't allowed to be grunge. I wanted to be grunge because it was a movement, but no one would let me in. So as unique as the Chili Peppers were on their island, Hole has always been on its own little island. I'd also say the same for Nine Inch Nails and the Smashing Pumpkins back then."

Perhaps Love can re-stake her claim on the music world with a new album and her memoir. Keep an eye out for both projects, which are each expected in December.